What is the Separation of Church & State?

In 1802, Thomas Jefferson wrote a letter to the Danbury Baptist Assoc. (Connecticut) in response to a request for their President to stand for religious liberty.  He replied:

Gentlemen

The affectionate sentiments of esteem and approbation which you are so good as to express towards me, on behalf of the Danbury Baptist association, give me the highest satisfaction. My duties dictate a faithful and zealous pursuit of the interests of my constituents, & in proportion as they are persuaded of my fidelity to those duties, the discharge of them becomes more and more pleasing.

Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should “make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,” thus building a wall of separation between Church & State. Adhering to this expression of the supreme will of the nation in behalf of the rights of conscience, I shall see with sincere satisfaction the progress of those sentiments which tend to restore to man all his natural rights, convinced he has no natural right in opposition to his social duties.

I reciprocate your kind prayers for the protection & blessing of the common father and creator of man, and tender you for yourselves & your religious association, assurances of my high respect & esteem.

Th Jefferson

Did you catch what he said in the last line of the first column?  “…building a wall of separation between Church & State.”  There’s not many more words that have been misused and abused than these.  The ACLU and other agnostic, communistic liberals have convinced themselves that Thomas Jefferson was actually on their side.  They sincerely believe that what they do, when they protect the government from the church, is right!  But that was not his intent.

I’m so thankful to live in ‘small-town’ America – where there isn’t so much of the big-city influence.  We have enjoyed great growth in Spencer County over the last several years – but with that growth, we have seen a shift in our morals.  They have drifted a long way away from where they were anchored over two hundred years ago.

Pivotal Point

Our local leadership remains at a pivotal point – with critical decisions still on the table…  Occupational tax?  City/county merge?  Alcohol by-the-drink?  At the national level, our legislators are considering making it a crime to speak the truth about sexual sins like sodomy and adultery.  This is a pivotal moment in American culture.

I trust that you understand that religious liberties and freedoms are not granted nor governed by the people – but by God.  I truly believe that Mayor Pay and County Judge Jenkins are smart enough to keep their politics out of our churches; however, I’m afraid the churches are not smart enough to keep their Christianity in politics and government.

The ‘wall of separation’  is for them, not us! It was created, by our founding fathers, to protect the church from the influence of government.  The church has a responsibility to be involved with its government.  Christian, it is your duty to stand up & speak up.  Call out the injustice. Pray for all who are in authority.  Vote your convictions.  If not you, then who?  If not now, then when?  If not here, then where?  It not for this, then why?  If not… God forbid.

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One Response to “What is the Separation of Church & State?”

  1. The Glenn Beck Review Reply 06/13/2010 at 12:55pm

    I have a post up today about James Madison’s views about the separation of church and state that you might enjoy.

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